Shabby Sketches #33: Half-Assed Mandala

So this is what happens when your parents watch a movie in the native language they never taught you and there are no subtitles:


It is half-assed but this is all I could do in 120 mins. I had a lot of fun and I am definitely inspired to do another later on!

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Just Kindergarten Things

I have been having a really tough time lately so I was looking through some of my older things like cards and pictures to cheer myself up. I came across a folder containing things from my kindergarten days. For those unfamiliar with the term kindergarten, it is the one or two years of schooling some countries have before 1st grade and I was around 3-4 years old when I joined. After brushing off the dust, here’s a list of my archaeological findings (after all it has been a while since I was in kindergarten):

1. My colouring books were quite inappropriate:

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Shabby Sketches #30: How to draw a camel!

It’s hump day today and I needed to procrastinate important work so I decided to draw a camel in honour of this lovely weekday. The only problem is I haven’t drawn anything since 2008 and I mostly got C’s in Art class in school. I really think the way art class is graded needs to be changed. You should be graded on effort rather than the final product. So what if my self-portrait looks like something from Beavis and Butthead? At least it looks human-ish and I deserve an A for that! But regardless, there’s a hack to producing somewhat decent drawings and that involves a ton of geometric shapes and lines as I will show below:

First, find a picture you want to replicate as closely as possible. Then identify and draw the most prominent geometric shape you can see from the picture. This is the picture I used:

The most evident shape is the circle in the camel’s torso.

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From then on, just keep extending your drawing with more lines and shapes. It doesn’t have to be exact or symmetrical. I used a roll of tape to draw the circle but free handed all the lines and squares.

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Drawing lines across the drawing help with placement, shape and size of features. In this case, I used the lines to determine placement and shape of my camel’s legs.

Then I added the camel’s neck and face. Here’s a warning – I am absolutely TERRIBLE at smaller features and details like faces, fingers, shadows, etc. So feel free to laugh at what follows.

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